11 min Health Have you ever imagined healing burns with light? Science already, and the method is promising!

11 min Health Have you ever imagined healing burns with light?  Science already, and the method is promising!

A study at the University of Buffalo (USA) found that photobiomodulation (a therapy performed with the aid of lights) has the potential to regenerate tissue and speed up burn recovery.

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The therapy has been used effectively in supportive treatment of cancer, age-related macular degeneration, and even Alzheimer’s. That’s because a common denominator among these diseases is the central role of inflammation, and the study points to a role for photobiomodulation in smoothing inflammation while promoting tissue regeneration.

Light treatment helps to heal burns (Image: Ramez E. Nassif/Unsplash)

What is photobiomodulation?

Previously known as low-intensity laser therapy (LLLT), photobiomodulation is nothing more than the treatment of wounds and injuries using light, whether laser or LED. The applied light is capable of activating or inhibiting essential cellular behaviors in the recovery process, that is, it is possible to modulate the treatment based on the dose, potency, time and frequency of application.

The study measured the effect of laser and low-dose photobiomodulation on closure of third-degree burns over a nine-day period. The treatment stimulated several types of cells involved in healing, including fibroblasts (the main connective tissue cells in the body that play an important role in tissue repair) and macrophages (immune cells that reduce inflammation, clear cell debris, and fight infection ).

The researchers also developed an accurate burn healing protocol for photobiomodulation treatments to ensure that laser use does not inadvertently cause additional thermal injury. The full study can be found here.